Dirty Great Love Story**** (Arts Theatre)

Posted: January 25, 2017 in Uncategorized
Dirty Great Love Story Production Photos Photo Credit: Richard Davenport for The Other Richard

Dirty Great Love Story Production Photos
Photo Credit: Richard Davenport for The Other Richard

“All love stories are good, but the great ones are dirty” we are told as this bubbly 90-minute comedy nears its conclusion. “Dirty” means “messy” (or sometimes not), as we hear a tale of awkward coupling in the age of over-active smart phones and gentrified cities. The characters involved are called Richard Marsh and Katie Bonna, which just happens to be the names of the play’s writers.

The couple enters as if about to perform a comedy double act and, on a white rectangular platform with just two moveable chairs, Richard (Felix Scott) and Katie (Ayesha Antoine) tell us how they met when a stag party and a hen party collided. He is one of the lads, describing himself as “not good-looking in the classical sense”. She is flirtatious, eats gluten-free croissants and is prone to drinking too much. She has been dumped by her boyfriends, he is unlikely to have been in a relationship that reached such a stage. Each regards the other as “not my type” and a night together in a convenient Travel Lodge does little to change that. To anyone who has ever seen a romantic comedy, nothing that follows is even slightly unpredictable as they meet again at a mutual friend’s wedding (not four of them this time) and a christening, but the play’s strength grows out of it’s simplicity and Pia Furtado’s lively. no frills production is content to cash in on the story’s familiarity.

The writing is full of sharp observational comedy, with the added twist that it is in rhyming verse. The laughs are loudest when the rhymes are at their most forced,  Scott and Antoine showing the comic timing to milk them all. They make an endearing pair, self-effacing and innocent as they fumble their ways through the rough and tumble of modern romance. Yes, every situation described in the play is as old as Adam and Eve, but there is a charming freshness running through the writing and the performances that makes it all feel brand new.

Performance date: 25 January 2017

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